Il nome del vento (Italian Edition) - Kindle edition by Patrick Rothfuss, Gabriele Giorgi. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets . Kingkiller Chronicle) (English Edition) eBook: Patrick Rothfuss: narledikupttemp.ga: Il libro è uno spin-off della saga principale:"il nome del vento", il libro parla di Auri . Results 1 - 16 of 32 1 Mar | Kindle eBook El temor de un hombre sabio (Crónica del asesino de reyes 2) (Spanish Il nome del vento (Italian Edition).

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    Il Nome Del Vento Ebook

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    Rothfuss, you probably don't give a shit about my rating since, judging from your GR biography, you appear to be very comfortable in your own academic, geeky skin. And that is totally cool. I'm an academic, geeky type myself. Not as geeky as you. You are really geeky.

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    Like I said: that's cool. One star for each of them. But, like I hinted, the book is pretty bad. So are you and me good? No hard feelings? I don't take shit too personally, either. So now I'll get down to ripping your book, knowing we can still be friends. In the interest of full disclosure, I faithfully admit that this book goes in my DNF shelf.

    I just couldn't finish it. I gave it a good honest try and eventually found myself reading only so I wouldn't have to admit to my brother that I didn't like it enough to finish. But that isn't a good reason to spend my time—something we have precious little of in our short lives—reading something I dislike and not getting paid for it.

    So I'm sorry, bro. I tried.

    Yes, my brother is one of my GR friends and will likely see this review. Now on to the reasons I couldn't finish the book. Most of The Name of the Wind is written in the first person; it's the autobiography of Kvothe, who has a number of things in common with "The Most Interesting Man in the World.

    First, Bast is described as "sharp and delicate, almost beautiful, with striking blue eyes. Third, Bast follows Kvothe around like a puppy dog. Fourth, Bast likes to tuck Kvothe into bed and watch him sleep. Fifth, Bast cries like a little girl when he hears something sad.

    Finally, Bast apparently can manifest himself as some sort of goat-man creature. Do you see where I'm going with this? Kvothe runs a bed-and-breakfast, in which a very sensitive and beautiful man follows him around and occasionally turns into a goat. Bed-and-breakfast and goat-men: what could be sexier? Not that there's anything wrong with that.

    I believe everyone should have the freedom be who they were born to be and I have several close friends who happen to be gay; I'm the last person who would have a problem with Kvothe and his beautiful male companion getting frisky goat-style, of course.

    I only mention the implied homoerotic connection because Kvothe a. The Most Interesting Man in the World is supposed to be a lady-killer. No, not a psycho rapist murderer, you freaks. A lady-killa. A Lover of Women. I suppose that's not necessarily inconsistent; perhaps Kvothe swings both ways. Let's all say it together, now: not that there's anything wrong with that. First-person narrative is reserved for Kvothe's recitation of his life story.

    The remainder of the book, particularly the scenes of Kvothe manhandling his lover in front of the scribe Bast said Kvothe leaves bruises , are written in the third-person. I'll address my displeasure with the third-person sections first. Let me clarify at the outset that I have no problem with the writer switching between first-person and third-person narrative.

    I recognize it can be a powerful tool and it serves the structure of this story quite well. The book begins in the third-person, then as Kvothe tells his life story it switches to first-person, then back to third-person for occasional interludes. My problem is with the author switching his narrative voice within the third-person sections.

    The academic geek is all over the place in that regard. Sometimes he writes a scene in third-person subjective, other times third-person objective. Some passages read like third-person limited, others third-person omniscient.

    At points the author seemed to switch voice page to page, or even paragraph to paragraph. In one especially irritating scene he even threw in a hint of first-person for a paragraph or so. But, like I hinted, the book is pretty bad. So are you and me good? No hard feelings? I don't take shit too personally, either.

    So now I'll get down to ripping your book, knowing we can still be friends. In the interest of full disclosure, I faithfully admit that this book goes in my DNF shelf.

    I just couldn't finish it. I gave it a good honest try and eventually found myself reading only so I wouldn't have to admit to my brother that I didn't like it enough to finish. But that isn't a good reason to spend my time—something we have precious little of in our short lives—reading something I dislike and not getting paid for it. So I'm sorry, bro. I tried. Yes, my brother is one of my GR friends and will likely see this review. Now on to the reasons I couldn't finish the book.

    Patrick Rothfuss - Il nome del vento. Le cronache dell'assassino del re - Free eBooks Download

    Most of The Name of the Wind is written in the first person; it's the autobiography of Kvothe, who has a number of things in common with "The Most Interesting Man in the World. First, Bast is described as "sharp and delicate, almost beautiful, with striking blue eyes.

    Third, Bast follows Kvothe around like a puppy dog. Fourth, Bast likes to tuck Kvothe into bed and watch him sleep. Fifth, Bast cries like a little girl when he hears something sad. Finally, Bast apparently can manifest himself as some sort of goat-man creature. Do you see where I'm going with this?

    Kvothe runs a bed-and-breakfast, in which a very sensitive and beautiful man follows him around and occasionally turns into a goat.

    Bed-and-breakfast and goat-men: what could be sexier? Not that there's anything wrong with that. I believe everyone should have the freedom be who they were born to be and I have several close friends who happen to be gay; I'm the last person who would have a problem with Kvothe and his beautiful male companion getting frisky goat-style, of course.

    I only mention the implied homoerotic connection because Kvothe a. The Most Interesting Man in the World is supposed to be a lady-killer. No, not a psycho rapist murderer, you freaks.

    A lady-killa. A Lover of Women. I suppose that's not necessarily inconsistent; perhaps Kvothe swings both ways.

    Patrick Rothfuss

    Let's all say it together, now: not that there's anything wrong with that. First-person narrative is reserved for Kvothe's recitation of his life story. The remainder of the book, particularly the scenes of Kvothe manhandling his lover in front of the scribe Bast said Kvothe leaves bruises , are written in the third-person. I'll address my displeasure with the third-person sections first. Let me clarify at the outset that I have no problem with the writer switching between first-person and third-person narrative.

    I recognize it can be a powerful tool and it serves the structure of this story quite well. The book begins in the third-person, then as Kvothe tells his life story it switches to first-person, then back to third-person for occasional interludes. My problem is with the author switching his narrative voice within the third-person sections.

    The academic geek is all over the place in that regard. Sometimes he writes a scene in third-person subjective, other times third-person objective. Some passages read like third-person limited, others third-person omniscient. At points the author seemed to switch voice page to page, or even paragraph to paragraph.

    In one especially irritating scene he even threw in a hint of first-person for a paragraph or so. Maybe if I'd kept reading I would have found a scene or two in second-person, just for good measure. The switching of narrative voices was confusing and frustrating. I certainly understand the advantages of an omniscient narrator that can relate some scenes from one character's point of view and others from a second character's point of view, and so on.

    But that theory doesn't fit The Name of the Wind. And the theory doesn't explain why some scenes are told from the points of view of everyone present a voice that strikes me as pompous and unreal while other scenes are described objectively, from nobody's point of view.

    Still other scenes alternate points of view paragraph by paragraph, or even sentence by sentence, and at a couple of points I wasn't entirely sure who's thoughts I was reading. Such constant switching without an obvious purpose or pattern made the omniscient narrator if that's what was intended seem unreliable.

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